Tag Archives: feminism

Weekly News Roundup! – Model’s Rights, #1reasonwhy and Women in Gaming, and Events!

Hey Folks!

News Links:

The BBC has an awesome feature on the right’s of models.  The feature talks about the demand for child labour in the industry, the pressure that women are under to maintain a certain body type, and how they are dehumanized and abused. Sara Ziff, model and author of the feature produced a documentary in 2009 entitle “Picture Me”. Here’s the trailer:

“Picture Me” has been storming the fashion world since its release in Spring 2010. This is how the fashion world looks like, from the inside.

The hashtag #1reasonwhy has been trending on twitter. It addresses sexism in the game industry and has women who work in the industry addressing the number one reason why it sucks to be a woman in the gaming industry.

Also David Gaider a writer for the local game company Bioware addressed why it is sooooo crucial to have a female perspective in game development.

The UN’s Millenium Development Goals will be addressing LGBTQ discrimination in the post-2015 agenda.

Jacob Tobia, a human rights intern for the UN writes:

For lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) people across the world, this is an important moment. Given the vast and overwhelming nature of the discrimination faced by the LGBTI community worldwide, it is important that the post-2015 agenda addresses the development needs of LGBTI people. This is because, in so many respects, homophobia and development cannot mix.

From aptn.ca Two Aboriginal Women have been honoured with the Order of Canada.

Aaju Peter is an Inuk lawyer, clothing designer and activist. She spent a lifetime fighting for Inuit rights and raising awareness about the challenges faced in the North.

Michele Rouleau is the former present of the Quebec Native Women’s Association and is now the president of Wabanok Productions. She’s being recognized for her years of dedication to the Aboriginal and human rights.

Events in Edmonton:

Friday at the Citadel there’s a Rising Youth Poetry Slam hosted by the Breath in Poetry Collective, the Rising Youth Poetry Slam is an opportunity for young poets to showcase their art to their friends, family and peers. Though this event is structured as a competitive poetry slam, the idea is for each young poet to challenge themselves.

Dec 6, all day there will be an ICE vigil to acknowledge and remember the Montreal Massacre as well as draw attention to issues of gender based violence on campus. There will be hot chocolate at noon! It is being organized by Feminists at the U of A, Engineers without Boarders, and AP!RG. The vigil will happen infront of ETLC on the University of Alberta campus.

There will be an encore screening of “Who Cares”, a documentary addressing sex work and prostitution in Edmonton. This will take place on Dec 9th at the Metro Cinema. I attended the premier earlier this week and it was fantastic, also sold out!! I highly recommend the film!

Feminist News Roundup! – Thanksgiving, Motion 408, and Girls Learn to Code

It’s American Thanksgiving. Something to think about.

Here’s another great post on Thanksgiving from Racialicious, entitled “Thanksgiving Special: RECLAIMING Their VOICE: The Native American Vote in New Mexico & Beyond”

Here’s some past posts we have done on it:

Thanksgiving for Feminists

Good Reads: Racism in Feminism, Colonialism and Thanksgiving, Rethinking Exercise, and Going Back to an Abuser

Other News:

From rabble.ca, Harper continual slashes transit funding as the climate crisis deepens.

Also another great article on Rabble. “Sexism, ableism and other anti-choice claims: What you need to know about Motion 408

From the Canadian Press – A federal court judge is expected to rule today on whether two unions can seek a judicial review of the decision to grant temporary foreign worker permits to a northern B.C. coal mine.

Awesome story about Ladies Learning Code teaching young girls to kick butt in the sciences.

Events Coming Up in Edmonton:

More exciting things! TEDx Talks Edmonton Women – The Space Between is happening Dec 1 all day. You can get your tickets here!

Check out the screening of the Who Cares Documentary, premiering at the Metro Cinema on Tuesday Nov 27. Facebook event located here.

There will be a filming of Miss Representation at the Alberta Art Gallery on Thursday Nov. 29. Check it our on Facebook here.

There will also be another screening on Thursday Nov 29, of Entitled Exposure :: What I Love About Being Queer. Also on Facebook.

SB

News and links: Alison Redford elected, Nancy Riche dies, thoughts on raising a son for a trans man, and queer teens

  • Another death in the NDP party: Nancy Riche. “Her contributions to this province were many, in her roles as activist, feminist and champion of workers’ rights. She has left a substantial legacy that will never be forgotten.”
  • Great post on raising a son as a leftist, queer, gender revolutionary who is also a trans man.

Links: How to Address Sexual Violence, Feminism and Dating, and Being Better Allies

Combating sexual violence is a key part of the movement for social justice.

Why is it so important to remember these connections? Because it has a big impact on our tactics. Without understanding the broader connections, combatting sexual violence gets simplified into just educating women about safety when going out at night.

Combating sexual violence gets simplified into telling young girls not to talk to strangers.

Combating sexual violence gets simplified into telling women to dress more modestly.

Combating sexual violence gets simplified into relying on the criminal (in)justice system to protect us from violence.

Combating sexual violence is not simple, and its elimination is going to require a big picture strategy that takes into account all of the factors that contribute to its existence.

I had a friend who gave me a copy of Why Men Love Bitches by Sherry Argov. I was frustrated that an intelligent, independent woman was getting her advice from a book like that. There are also plenty of books written by men about dating for women. [Travis L. Stork’s] Don’t Be That Girl was probably the most appalling book I’ve ever read. Each chapter was a caricature of a woman – Busy Girl, Needy Girl, Whiny Girl – and advice on how not to be that girl, including, “Don’t talk about your job too much” and “Don’t ask when he’s going to call.” These dating books fall into a long tradition of men diagnosing women and their nervousness.

It glosses over substantial differences in experience in a way that can be hurtful, insulting and alienating.  After Prop 8 banned same-gender marriage in California, gay news magazine the Advocate published a cover story that declared that “gay is the new black.”  The problem is, this is frequently stated by white queer people.  And while white queer people have historically experienced hate crimes, police raids, and a whole lot more, we haven’t been lynched, been forced to sit at the back of the bus, or experienced the accumulation of oppression over generations on a single family or neighborhood.  Black/African-American communities have.  Intentional or not, claiming that “gay is the new black” is deeply disrespectful, and it’s often experienced as such.

News: Ontario Police Sued by Sexual Assault Survivor, Women Making Less Time for Friends, and Gender Gap at Crown Corporations

  • A woman has sued the Ontario police after being terribly mistreated by them after she was assaulted by Russell William, having her case poorly investigated, and for not being warned prior to her assault that assaults were occurring in her  town. Big trigger warning.