Category Archives: Sexism in Communities

Expert At Your Craft

On this episode, we discuss the challenges and triumphs of being a woman entrepreneur. First we speak with Andrea Beça, the host of That’s So Maven, a podcast about women business owners in Edmonoton, about what’s she’s learned from speaking to so many women entrepreneurs. Then we hear from Carrie Armstrong, the owner of Mother Earth Essentials, an Aboriginal owned business, about what put her on the path to starting her own business. And finally we hear from Muhga Eltigani, the founder and CEO of NaturAll Club, about her line of fresh fruit hair products, and creating spaces to support black women and their businesses.

For more information on Andrea Beça and That’s So Maven visit: www.andreabeca.work/

For more information on Carrie Armstrong and Mother Earth Essentials visit: motherearthessentials.ca/

For more information on Muhga Eltigani and NaturAll Club visit: naturallclub.com/

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Emotional Currency

On this episode, we explore the concept of emotional labour and how it applies to everyday life and relationships. We start off with a group discussion reflecting on why emotional labour is relevant to us personally. Then we hear an interview with Ubah Mohamoud about why she began hosting healing circles for black Muslim women and the emotional toll of dealing with violent Islamophobia and racism in the media and in Canadian society.

News: Breast cancer risks, alcohol consumption during pregnancy, lesbian student fights discrimination, Indigenous women debate sex work legalization

Breast Cancer risk has risen for South Asian women. From the BBC:

Historically women from this ethnic group have had a lower risk of the disease than white British women, the University of Sheffield team said.

But they found breast cancer incidence had risen in recent years for South Asian women.

Experts said lifestyle factors such as obesity, or more coming forward for screening could explain the change.

The researchers, who are presenting their work to the National Cancer Intelligence Network Conference in Brighton on Friday, looked at census and cancer data for 135,000 women from different ethnic backgrounds from 2000-2009.

Between 2000-2004, South Asian women were found to have a 45% cent lower rate of breast cancer compared with white women.

But by the 2005-2009 period, rates of breast cancer among South Asian women had increased significantly and had risen to be 8% higher than white women, whose rates had not changed significantly.

 

Some misleading messages in Wales has  lead to confusion about how much alcohol is safe to consume during pregnancy.

last year mothers-to-be were warned by researchers at Oxford and Bristol Universities that drinking one or two glasses of wine a week during pregnancy could have an impact on a child’s IQ.

In a report, Public Health Wales (PHW) said such “constant changes to advice in relation to alcohol are unhelpful”.

It said it caused “confusion and can also result in a lack of trust and regard for future messages, not only in relation to alcohol, but also for other health issues”.

While the prevalence of substance misuse during pregnancy is not clear, PHW said some 64,000 Welsh children may be adversely affected by parental alcohol problems.

Despite this, services and support for substance misuse in pregnancy vary across Wales and tend to focus more on drugs, it added.

The report recommended that midwives and nurses around Wales be given training to discuss the issue with women and encourage and support them to try to cut down on their drinking.

The article also published some effects of drinking while pregnant:

  • When a pregnant woman drinks alcohol, the levels of alcohol in her baby’s blood rise as high as her own
  • Because the baby’s liver is immature, it can’t break down the alcohol as fast as an adult can
  • This means the baby is exposed to greater amounts of alcohol for longer than the mother
  • When an unborn baby is constantly exposed to alcohol, a particular group of problems can develop, known as foetal alcohol syndrome
  • The government advises pregnant women to avoid alcohol completely, although if they do choose to drink, it says not to have more than one to two units of alcohol once or twice a week.
  • The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists says there’s no evidence a couple of units once or twice a week will harm the baby. Binges, even if you don’t do it regularly, are definitely to be avoided

A University that expelled a lesbian student on the grounds that she was dating a woman, is now demanding her to return $6,000 in financial aid.

In 2011, Grace University, a Christian university, expelled Danielle Powell, only months before graduating, after discovering that she was in a relationship with another woman. The university is now demanding she pay $6,000 of federal student financial aid she received for her studies since she did not finish the semester.

Aptn has a video up on the debate within Indigenous communities on whether or not prostitution should be made legal.

“Canada needs to take a stand that we’re not going to live off the backs of our women, our vulnerable women who feel this is a choice. This is not a choice,” said Perrier, now 37, who co-founded the Toronto organization Sextrade101. “This is was not my choice, it was his choice.”

Perrier said Canada should adopt a similar policy as Sweden where the client can be charged but not the sex trade worker.

 

Weekly News Roundup! – Model’s Rights, #1reasonwhy and Women in Gaming, and Events!

Hey Folks!

News Links:

The BBC has an awesome feature on the right’s of models.  The feature talks about the demand for child labour in the industry, the pressure that women are under to maintain a certain body type, and how they are dehumanized and abused. Sara Ziff, model and author of the feature produced a documentary in 2009 entitle “Picture Me”. Here’s the trailer:

“Picture Me” has been storming the fashion world since its release in Spring 2010. This is how the fashion world looks like, from the inside.

The hashtag #1reasonwhy has been trending on twitter. It addresses sexism in the game industry and has women who work in the industry addressing the number one reason why it sucks to be a woman in the gaming industry.

Also David Gaider a writer for the local game company Bioware addressed why it is sooooo crucial to have a female perspective in game development.

The UN’s Millenium Development Goals will be addressing LGBTQ discrimination in the post-2015 agenda.

Jacob Tobia, a human rights intern for the UN writes:

For lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) people across the world, this is an important moment. Given the vast and overwhelming nature of the discrimination faced by the LGBTI community worldwide, it is important that the post-2015 agenda addresses the development needs of LGBTI people. This is because, in so many respects, homophobia and development cannot mix.

From aptn.ca Two Aboriginal Women have been honoured with the Order of Canada.

Aaju Peter is an Inuk lawyer, clothing designer and activist. She spent a lifetime fighting for Inuit rights and raising awareness about the challenges faced in the North.

Michele Rouleau is the former present of the Quebec Native Women’s Association and is now the president of Wabanok Productions. She’s being recognized for her years of dedication to the Aboriginal and human rights.

Events in Edmonton:

Friday at the Citadel there’s a Rising Youth Poetry Slam hosted by the Breath in Poetry Collective, the Rising Youth Poetry Slam is an opportunity for young poets to showcase their art to their friends, family and peers. Though this event is structured as a competitive poetry slam, the idea is for each young poet to challenge themselves.

Dec 6, all day there will be an ICE vigil to acknowledge and remember the Montreal Massacre as well as draw attention to issues of gender based violence on campus. There will be hot chocolate at noon! It is being organized by Feminists at the U of A, Engineers without Boarders, and AP!RG. The vigil will happen infront of ETLC on the University of Alberta campus.

There will be an encore screening of “Who Cares”, a documentary addressing sex work and prostitution in Edmonton. This will take place on Dec 9th at the Metro Cinema. I attended the premier earlier this week and it was fantastic, also sold out!! I highly recommend the film!

The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence in Our Communities

I am not proposing that sexual violence and domestic violence will no longer exist. I am proposing that we create a world where so many people are walking around with the skills and knowledge to support someone that there is no longer a need for anonymous hotlines.

I am proposing that we break through the shame of survivors (a result of rape culture) and the victim-blaming ideology of all of us (also a result of rape culture), so that survivors can gain support from the people already in their lives. I am proposing that we create a society where community members care enough to hold an abuser accountable so that a survivor does not have to flee their home. I am proposing that all of the folks that have been disappointed by systems work together to create alternative systems. I am proposing that we organize.

– from the ‘zine intro 

The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence in Our Communities

It’s one thing when a perpetrator is the police, the state, or someone we don’t know. It’s quite another when that person is someone we call friend, lover, mentor, trusted ally.

To effectively resist violence out there-in the prison system, on militarized borders, or during other clear encounters with “the system”-we must challenge how it is reproduced right where we live.

Let’s talk about it.

Come to The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence in Our Communities

From small zine, to big zine, to book, The Revolution Starts at Home is inspiring thought, conversation and action around ways to address intimate violence in communities in ways that honour survivors, hold perpetrators accountable, and doesn’t necessarily involved the state.

Join co-editors, Ching-In Chen, and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha for a presentation and discussion about potentially life-saving alternatives for creating survivor safety while building a movement where no one is left behind.

There will be two events:

Speaking Event: Monday, March 19th @ 6:30pm – 9:00pm at the Telus centre on U of A campus

Workshop: Tuesday, March 20th @6:30pm – Please contact Denise at volunteer@apirg.org for details, and to register!